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Healthcare Professionals

Baby's sensory journey through food

In baby’s first year, they spend much of their time exploring and learning about the world around them using their five senses—touch, sight, taste, smell, and hearing. Parents can use environmental stimuli, such as mealtimes, to accelerate the development of each sense to near maturity several months after birth.

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Healthcare Professionals

In favor of flavor training

What is it that sets some children on a poor eating path rather than a healthy one? Why do some children eat their veggies and ask for fruit as snacks, rather than highly-processed foods? While it can feel to parents like their child was born that way, the truth is far more complex. And well within their control.

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The Eating Journey

The window of opportunity: What is it?

Like talking and walking, acquiring a love healthy food is something baby learns. How can you get your child to choose peppers over pizza?  

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Pregnancy

The Good, the Bad and the Sometimes: Your Pregnancy Food Guide

You’ve probably heard the saying ‘baby eats what mom eats’, and that’s true! But let’s put your fears to rest - pregnancy does not mean you need to go on a crazy diet. Rather, most of the time it’s all about choosing whole foods for optimal nutrition

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Healthcare Professionals

Helping baby’s microbiome thrive

So far, over 2,100 microorganisms have been identified as living in and on the human body (Source). When it comes to the gut, almost 400 of these microorganisms inhabit this environment; this diverse and abundant community of microorganisms is referred to as the gut microbiome.

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Starting Safe, Staying Safe

Easy to digest choking tips

Nothing makes a parent’s heart skip a beat faster than the sound of a baby coughing at mealtime. 

Is your baby choking?

This stress often builds as parents start to introduce solid foods into their baby’s diet. The good news is that choking, while scary, is largely preventable and not as common as you think it is.

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A taste of what you'll discover

Food with thought: Encouraging a healthy relationship with food.

By Diana K Rice, Nutrition, LLC, RD, LD, CLEC

Starting solids poses such a challenge because we’re not only trying to sort through all of the available information and opinions on the topic, but also fit a brand new feeding and food preparation routine into our already busy lives. And, in the hustle to get this done, we often forget the most important element of introducing our children to food: Helping them foster a healthy relationship with food for life.

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Are we failing our next generation?

By Frances McGrath, BNurs, BAppSc, DipNut
Reviewed by Catherine Foresetell, PhD

With a death toll of over 200,000 Americans and rising from Covid-19, we are all feeling the effects of this cruel pandemic. What it has highlighted however, is that certain conditions appear to increase the severity of the symptoms and the risk of death; at the top of the list is obesity and the health complications associated with it.

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Creating healthy and happy eaters

  • You provide, let baby decide. You provide what foods are on offer, and baby decides when they have had enough
  • Keep mealtimes happy and stress free
  • Remove unnecessary distractions such as TV or devices
  • Ensure baby is sitting comfortably and facing other family members
  • Role model healthy eating at every opportunity.
  • Respond to hunger and fullness cues and leave behind expectations of how much you want baby to eat. 
  • Feed slowly, encouraging baby to eat and never resorting to bribery
  • Avoid unhealthy foods you know baby will eat to ensure they ‘just eats something’
  • Only offer food for hunger and not for any other reason

Disclaimer: The information provided is the opinion of Good Feeding, it has not been evaluated by healthcare professionals, and is for educational purposes only. Before starting any new foods or feeding practices, please consult your baby's healthcare professional.

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Creating a veggie lover

  1. Pack in those veggies when you’re pregnant and breastfeeding

    Baby’s flavour journey begins in the womb surrounded by your amniotic fluid. Breastfeed if possible to continue the flavour journey through your breast milk.

  2. Begin Flavor training at around 4-5 months

    Flavor training starts before baby needs solids for nutrition. A ‘taste’, 1/2 teaspoon, is all that is required, after a milk feed.

  3. Vary your Veggies

    • Introduce a wide variety of vegetables spanning the whole flavor spectrum. Being sure to include plenty of bitter vegetables (broccoli, spinach, brussels sprouts).
    • Try offering a new ‘taste’ every 1-2 days In all different forms (warm, cold, puree and after 6 months as finger foods)
  4. No health by stealth

    Offer single vegetables where possible, especially in the first few months of flavor training. Avoid hiding ‘unliked’ foods in ‘liked’ foods.

  5. Repetition, repetition, repetition

    If baby doesn’t like it the first time offer again and again. It can take up to 10 times before acceptance. Don’t be put off by funny faces baby is just getting used to something new. Continue to offer again and again, throughout infancy, toddlerhood and the preschool years

  6. Be a healthy eating role model

    Be a positive role model at all ages and stages, show baby just how delicious those veggies are. Avoid allowing your own likes or dislikes, wants and expectations get in the way.

Disclaimer: The information provided is the opinion of Good Feeding, it has not been evaluated by healthcare professionals, and is for educational purposes only. Before starting any new foods or feeding practices, please consult your baby's healthcare professional.

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